FAQs

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Do you accept insurance?

We accept all major insurance plans.

Do you have payment plans?

Yes, we work with each patient to set up a suitable payment plan.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is used to treat opiate addiction. This medication contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid receptor agonist. It relieves withdrawal symptoms by partially stimulating brain receptors responsive to opiates. Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist. The receptor antagonists block their target receptors preventing opiate-induced stimulation. Naloxone is a “safety switch” designed to prevent any possible abuse of Suboxone.

What is the difference between Suboxone and Methadone?

Buprenorphine (the key active component of Suboxone) is the same type of medication as Methadone. Naloxone (the second active component) is safety switch to prevent abuse of Buprenorphine. Most patients prefer Suboxone to Methadone because Suboxone intake does not require a constant supervision. Patients can be prescribed a monthly supply of Suboxone without a need of a daily visit. In contrast, Methadone replacement therapy requires daily visits to the clinic. Additionally, Suboxone is less addictive than Methadone; it also has fewer side effects, and a smaller risk of a fatal overdose.

How long will I be on Suboxone?

Each patient responds differently to the therapy; therefore there is no definite answer to this question. Eventually, a plan is set to gradually taper down Suboxone and then to get off this medication completely.

Is Suboxone addictive?

Buprenorphine is a partial opiate receptor agonist. It stimulates the same brain receptors as other opiates. This partial stimulation is sufficient to take away cravings and withdrawal symptoms, but it is insufficient to induce euphoria. Buprenorphine is addictive, however it is less addictive than other opiates including Methadone; it is easier to tapper down than Methadone due to less severe withdrawal symptoms.

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What is Vivitrol?

Vivitrol is the extended-release formulation of Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist used for treatment of alcoholism and opioid addiction. Vivitrol is administered by injection once-a-month. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Vivitrol for the treatment of alcohol abuse in 2006, and for the treatment of opioid addiction in 2010.

How often would I need to visit a psychiatrist?

Weekly visits are required during the first month. During the second month the visits are required once every two weeks. Following the first 60 days, you would only need to see a psychiatrist once a month (assuming that the urine toxicology tests are within the norm).

Can a patient’s family get involved in therapy?

We offer and encourage family sessions with a patient’s consent.

What if I don’t have insurance?

The cost of each visit is: initial $250.00, follow-up $150

Can patients come in the evening?

Yes. We schedule patients from 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM.

Do you treat pregnant women?

Treatment is available for women that are expecting

What happens when a patient relapses?

Our patients are required take regular urine drug tests. If an illicit substance is detected, we issue a warning letter to the patient. The patient is then required to see a psychiatrist weekly, and to attend group sessions and/or individual counseling. Every patient will only receive two warning letters (no exceptions). After a third relapse, the patient will be discharged from the program and referred to a higher level of care.

Do you offer one-on-one counseling or group sessions?

We offer both. One-on-one sessions are offered every day. Group sessions are offered four times a week.

What do I need to do to enter your program?

Just give us a phone call at 201-945-2905 or 201-676-0592. After a short phone interview with our intake coordinator, we will make an appointment for you.

most insurance plans accepted